Spoonfuls of Germany


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Gooseberries demystified: No goose involved but German roots

The notorious German precision and efficiency transpires in the language, too. Zartbitterschokolade (bittersweet chocolate), Hähnchengeschnetzeltes (sliced chicken in cream sauce), Sauerkirschmarmelade (sour cherry jam)… why use several words if you can pack it into one long composite noun?

A German food word that could not be more spot on is Stachelbeeren (gooseberries). Continue reading


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Food bond

Washtowel

Saying that I was nervous when I first set foot in my parents-in-law’s house the day before Thanksgiving in 2000 would be an understatement. Not only was I aware that the family of the man I was dating was Jewish.  Continue reading


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Stollen meets bread

sourdough-stollen-1

It was butter that made the city of Dresden the home of Germany’s most famous edible Christmas tradition. In 1491 Pope Innocent VIII gave in to the request of the Saxonian rulers to lift the ban on dairy products during the days of fasting. After he sent the legendary Butterbrief (“Butter Letter”) the bakers in Dresden started to use butter in their Stollen, and the sweet bread that we know today was born.

I love a good Stollen and frankly, in the time leading up to Christmas, I could eat it every day – if only it was a little less rich. Continue reading