Spoonfuls of Germany


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Gooseberries demystified: No goose involved but German roots

The notorious German precision and efficiency transpires in the language, too. Zartbitterschokolade (bittersweet chocolate), Hähnchengeschnetzeltes (sliced chicken in cream sauce), Sauerkirschmarmelade (sour cherry jam)… why use several words if you can pack it into one long composite noun?

A German food word that could not be more spot on is Stachelbeeren (gooseberries). Continue reading


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A tale of two kales

Kale SaladThere are many foods and recipes that carry the “German” label in the United States. Often they are a far cry from the real thing. The worst offender, in my view, is pumpernickel bread. In the US, it is almost always darkened and sweetened with molasses – something that is never done to authentic pumpernickel in Germany (find my recipe for real pumpernickel bread here).

The one big exception, in my view, where something German improved on this side of the Atlantic is kale (Grünkohl). Continue reading


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Girlie beer

berliner-weisse-mit-schuss-rot

2016 is a big year for German beer. It marks the 500th anniversary of the German Purity Law for Beer (Deutsches Reinheitsgebot für Bier) which established that only water, hops, malt and yeast and no artificial ingredients, enzymes or preservatives may be used in beer-brewing. For a quick, fun intro, I recommend the video 500 Years in 50 Seconds by the German Brewers Association (in English).

So why am I writing about beer only now? No, I have not been waiting around for Oktoberfest. Continue reading